Monthly Archives: April 2009

Sex Sells

Vote for me?

Vote for me?

Camilla Ferranit, pictured above, makes up one of many other glamorous faces that Silvio Berlusconi has unveiled as prospective European Parliamentary MPs for Italy. 

If his candidates are political lightweights and don’t have an idea between them, this is a shameless PR stunt that will doubtless backfire.  The vast majority of people take elections for who will represent them very seriously and any attempt to turn the European elections into a beauty contest will almost certainly be rebuffed.

However, if they are equally or more politically competent, driven and engaged with the population than a bunch of grey haired fella’s then I applaud Mr Berlusconi for bringing in to politics, in his words, “new and young faces”.

Make Labour’s next U-turn an EU-turn

 

The Conservative Party have release a new widget to launch their EU election campaign.  It’s based around the argument that The Labour Party promised a referendum on the EU Constitution and this has, according to the Tories, not been delivered.

The word play around ‘U-turn’ and ‘EU-turn’ doesn’t really make sense – what is an ‘EU-turn’?  It’s quite a basic widget and not that interesting, but they’ve made it INCREDIBLY easy to share so I imagine a lot of supporters will host it. 

If it is plastered over the interent I imagine it will be quite effective, even if the copywriter would be arrested by the logic police.

Mr Pinty’s Protest

mr-pinty

Above is a photo from the press stunt that was held in Westiminster recently to further promote the Axe The Beer Tax campaign.  This campaign is begining to pick up steam, with major brewers adding their weight with in-pub promotions and poster sites on the outside of breweries. 

With the Chancellor’s budget report happening tomorrow, this campaign (and others across the political and issue spectrum) will be waiting with baited breath for some good news.  Given the grave economic times, it is extremely unlikely that the beer tax will indeed be axed, but I doubt this will prevent Pinty and the gang having a few brews tomorrow after Darling’s speech!

The economic case for law changes on political advertising

Individuals and organisations have spent just over $270 million on political issue advertising in North America since Obama’s inauguration.  Experts predict that $1 billion could be spent in the USA on political advertising before the end of the year. 

 

Evan Tracey of Campaign Media Analysis Group reckons it’s all down to dough:

 

“If you look at what’s on the table — everything from how to unionize to how we’re going to get our energy to how we’re going to get health care to how big the government’s going to be and what role the government’s going to play — you have some interests with very big pockets that have an awful lot at stake”

 

Regardless of what’s causing it, political advertising contributes significantly to the American economy.  Not to keep whingeing about media laws in the UK, but advertising and media industries (which benefit the rest of the economy) could really do with getting a substantial extra revenue stream.  The moral argument has been clearly made for changing political advertising laws in the UK, perhaps it’s time for the economic one to be made too.

Political Advertising and Human Rights

Another day, another ruling that banning advertising with political content from the airwaves is illegal.  Adbusters – who made the above spot – has scored a great victory in The Supreme Court of British Columbia in Canada.  In a case against Canada’s CBC and Canwest Global, the court ruled that the airwaves are a public property where freedom of speech must prevail (judges’ ruling here).

EU Fudge – Jamie Oliveoil

A really well produced, funny and compelling piece of advertising by the  Tax Payers’ Alliance.  It features a Jamie Oliver doppelganger cooking up a recipe for disaster that represents the EU.  I’m amazed this hasn’t had more views, seems like the sort of thing that the slightly disgruntled Daily Mail readers would pass on to their friends in an instant.

Labour Party Attack Advert Strategy?

labour party attack advert

The Sun is running a story that The Labour Party are planning to use the ‘Tory Toff’ angle of attack in some upcoming political advertising.  The report claims that the campaign will feature “huge posters of those cringe-making student photosof George Osborne and David Cameron carrying the copy ‘Do you want these men to run Britain?’

Most research around the effects of negative political advertising suggests that it is very useful for reinforcing impressions that people have about certain things.  However, if you’re trying to change someone’s mind about something it usually turns them off.

Therefore the advertisement above would only get a positive reaction out of people who would already subscribe to the following statement: David Cameron cannot be trusted to run the country because he had a wealthy upbringing.

What percentage of the electorate would subscribe to such a statement? My guess would be very few.

I hope, for Labour supporters’ sake, that the Sun’s story is bogus.