Category Archives: US Democrat

Sarah Silverman 2012 – Let my people vote

Sarah Silverman has released her long-awaited follow-up to ‘The Great Schlep’ that received huge acclaim in 2008.  Similarly to her previous effort it takes on an unexpected element of the election narrative, is staunchly pro-Obama and provocatively rude towards the Republican candidate.

The focus for the video is new ‘Voter ID’ laws and whilst funny it lacks the political insight (focusing on elderly, Jewish, Florida-dwelling votes) and (relatively) clean-cut gags that made the original so great.

Nevertheless, the video’s message is convincing – the viewer is left with the impression that Voter ID is unfair and that sense of injustice is the sort of thing that gets supporters out on to the door step.

Not as good as the original, but that was a hard act to follow.  This video has gained millions of views in its first week and has contributed significantly to the narrative of the 2012 election.

RomneyShambles

The Democrat rapid response unit have made a montage of what has been dubbed ‘RomneyShambles’ – the phrase that has been coined to describe Mitt Romney’s thus far ill-fated visit to London.

The phrase ‘omnishambles’ is particularly popular amongst British politicos; it was brought to fame during the BBC’s political comedy “The Thick of It” and was used by Ed Milliband in the House of Commons in April 2012. 

As such the hash tag #RomneyShambles has been delighting the politico twitterati and has been trending all day.  Below is probably the best of the RomneyShamble images that have been doing the rounds.

Obama the socialist joker

Obama joker socialism

This poster is being stuck up around Los Angeles in a guerilla campaign to brand Obama as a socialist.  The poster is incredibly visually powerful, and for that reason it has recieved huge amounts of media coverage world wide.  It doesn’t really make logical sense, in the respect that the Joker (from Batman) was not a socialist. 

But things don’t always have to make sense to have an impact.

Organising in government

Lots of candidates that are elected on a wave of popularity pledge to bring their campaigning and organising frame of mind into government.  Here is the Democrats and Team Obama attempting to fulfill that ambition.  Not a great ad, but the sentiment of “we still need all ya’ll who helped get me elected” is just about carried through.  The triumphant emphasis every time the word “President” is used is probably a bit much, but after 8 years of Opposition, I’ll forgive them that one.

It’s worth mentioning that getting lots of people to sign up to your agenda for government is democratic and ‘grass roots’ to an extent.  But the challenge comes when you have to deal with a situation where a significant portion / majority of the public and your supporters disagree with the direction you’re trying to set and want to halt or change it.

Here is a better advert from Americans United for Change containing similar subject matter:

There’s no emphasis on grass roots activism, but it’s a much more compelling stand-alone piece of communication.  It would be a REALLY interesting experiment if you could isolate the two campaigns mentioned in this post in different areas of the country.  You could measure which approach – low budget TV ad with a small media spend but heavy organising activity v.s expensive animated TV ad and zero campaigning on the ground – is more effective in shaping peoples opinion.